The evolution of the Zack Morris phone
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The Evolution of the Zack Morris Cell Phone

zack morris phone

The Evolution of the Zack Morris Cell Phone

The evolution of cellular coverage has occurred so quickly that even teenagers remember the “good old days” when prepaid phones were a new option. Today, teens with an HTC 8X Windows phone or Android device can easily identify the quality increases between each phone upgrade (and in the USA, the average duration of phone ownership is 18 months).

 91.4 million of the world’s 1.08 billion smartphone owners are in the United States (in addition to 194.6 un-smart phone owners in the USA). While these numbers are anticipated to increase dramatically in the short term, the industry understands that the market will be saturated with phones eventually.

However, for now the race to provide the best coverage and phone quality directly corresponds to sales and profits. In fact, wireless revenue has been steadily increased since 1997 but can this trend continue once the market (and coverage map) are saturated with service?

1. Clearly Highlight Required Fields
It’s annoying as a user to submit a web form only to later find out that you’ve missed required input fields.

A common convention for highlighting required fields is to have an asterisk (*) beside their label. Explicitly stating that an input field is required or that the field is optional is a safe way to go.

The Zappos.com registration web form highlights required fields with an asterisk (*). Optional fields are explicitly stated.

2. Provide User-Friendly and Descriptive Error Messages
I’m sure you hate it when you make a mistake in a web form and all the error says is “You must fill out all of the required fields below,” when they should really provide a more specific error message like “You forgot to enter your e-mail address.”

Performing real-time data validation as the user is filling out the web form is a good solution to ambiguous error messages. For example, immediately after filling out the email address input field, the web form should check whether it’s in the correct format, and if it isn’t, the user is immediately notified.

Yahoo!’s sign up form provides meaningful real-time error messages even before the form is submitted.

1. Clearly Highlight Required Fields

It’s annoying as a user to submit a web form only to later find out that you’ve missed required input fields.

A common convention for highlighting required fields is to have an asterisk (*) beside their label. Explicitly stating that an input field is required or that the field is optional is a safe way to go.

Clearly Highlight Required FieldsThe Zappos.com registration web form highlights required fields with an asterisk (*). Optional fields are explicitly stated.

2. Provide User-Friendly and Descriptive Error Messages

I’m sure you hate it when you make a mistake in a web form and all the error says is “You must fill out all of the required fields below,” when they should really provide a more specific error message like “You forgot to enter your e-mail address.”

Performing real-time data validation as the user is filling out the web form is a good solution to ambiguous error messages. For example, immediately after filling out the email address input field, the web form should check whether it’s in the correct format, and if it isn’t, the user is immediately notified.

Provide User-Friendly and Descriptive Error MessagesYahoo!’s sign up form provides meaningful real-time error messages even before the form is submitted.

Read about best practices for hints and error-validation in web forms.

3. Use Client-Side (JavaScript) Data Format Validation

Using JavaScript data validation saves the user time, as well as reduces the amount of work your web server has to perform to process incoming web form submissions.Client-side error validation allows you to let users know they’ve made a mistake right away, instead of after they’ve submitted the form. This is good for any input fields that don’t need to check your database; things such as making sure the provided email address is in the correct format or that a phone number only contains numbers.

Use Client-Side (JavaScript) Data Format ValidationSurveyGizmo’s sign up form lets you know that the format of the email address you entered is invalid.

4. Visually Style Focused Form Fields to Let Users Know Where They Are

Make sure that you visually style input fields so that it is very apparent which field the user is on. You can do this by using the CSS :focus pseudo-class selector.

Visually Style Focused Form Fields to Let Users Know Where They AreWufoo’s web form visually styles the active input field by giving it a distinctive background.

Make the input field have a different border color at the minimum — by default, web browsers will do this for you, but make sure that the default color is distinctive against your website’s design.

Visually Style Focused Form Fields to Let Users Know Where They Are

Google Chrome’s default style for a focused input field is to provide it with a yellow border. In Firefox, it’s a faint blue border.

5. Show Progress Clearly

3. Use Client-Side (JavaScript) Data Format Validation
Using JavaScript data validation saves the user time, as well as reduces the amount of work your web server has to perform to process incoming web form submissions. Client-side error validation allows you to let users know they’ve made a mistake right away, instead of after they’ve submitted the form. This is good for any input fields that don’t need to check your database; things such as making sure the provided email address is in the correct format or that a phone number only contains numbers.

SurveyGizmo’s sign up form lets you know that the format of the email address you entered is invalid.

4. Visually Style Focused Form Fields to Let Users Know Where They Are
Make sure that you visually style input fields so that it is very apparent which field the user is on. You can do this by using the CSS :focus pseudo-class selector.

Wufoo’s web form visually styles the active input field by giving it a distinctive background.

Make the input field have a different border color at the minimum — by default, web browsers will do this for you, but make sure that the default color is distinctive against your website’s design.

Google Chrome’s default style for a focused input field is to provide it with a yellow border. In Firefox, it’s a faint blue border.

5. Show Progress Clearly

 Learn more surprising stats and facts from this info graphic about the evolution of cell phone coverage so that you can better understand how your device became the well-supported product that it is today. Knowing how far phones have come in the last decade will make you appreciate all five bars you can have on a 4G network today.

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